Southern California Program

Grant Abstracts 2014

Achievable Foundation

Culver City, CA
$150,000
December 2014

The Achievable Health Center is a state-licensed and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), which opened in 2013 to meet the unique and evolving healthcare needs of traditionally underserved Los Angeles-area individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.  The primary goals of the Achievable Health Center are to: (1) Implement a patient-centered medical home for children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families living in LA County; (2) Improve patients’ quality of care and access to primary and specialty health services; and (3) Improve the health status of patients.  Additionally, the Achievable Health Center aims to serve as model for other clinics statewide.  Patients have access to a full range of primary health care services, as well as in-house pediatric neurology and mental health services, and access to a vast specialty care referral network.  Extensive care coordination, enrollment and eligibility services, health education and extended visits will be offered.  W. M. Keck Foundation support during the clinic’s start-up phase is targeted to providing care for pediatric patients.  By the end of 2016, the Achievable Health Center expects to build its patient base to serve over 2,000 individuals and demonstrate the model’s sustainability.

Antelope Valley Partners for Health

Lancaster, CA
$175,000
December 2014

Antelope Valley Partners for Health (AVPH) will establish a Family Resource and Training Center in Lancaster, California.  The Center will be a valuable resource in a rural underserved community, where residents and professionals alike feel a scarcity of support in terms of training opportunities and community services.  Compounding the lack of services is the geographic size of the region and transportation challenges.  The Center will provide a place where community members can easily access health and social services to improve their well-being, and will offer trainings, workshops, events, and networking opportunities for community agencies and businesses to improve the level and number of services available to the community.  AVPH will provide the building for the Center, where an array of agencies will be co-located to offer services to the community.  Having a health clinic, nutrition services, case management, in-home support, and workforce development in one place will allow residents to more efficiently obtain services.  In addition, the training center will provide a place where local agency staff can receive capacity-building support to strengthen their programs and services.  AVHP anticipates that 3,000 families and 600 professionals will be served.  The W. M. Keck Foundation’s grant will be used to furnish and equip the training center, which will include a catering kitchen, and for a new full-time program/events manager.

Ascencia

Glendale, CA
$250,000
December 2014

Ascencia has embarked on its first capital campaign to raise $7.45 million to provide a new facility to house its Access Center and Emergency Housing program, add permanent supportive housing for homeless families and individuals, and strengthen its service delivery.  Currently, Ascencia serves 1,200 people annually, including 200 in its emergency shelter.  The campaign will enable the organization to serve more people in its shelter program and reduce the time clients take to move from homelessness to housing from 72 to 45 days.  It will also allow Ascencia to expand its geographic reach from the greater Glendale/Burbank area into new communities and broaden the continuum of care to achieve greater impact.  The Foundation’s grant will help complete renovation of the new Access Center.

Boys & Girls Club of the Foothills

Monrovia, CA
$150,000
December 2014

A three-year grant will provide start-up funding for a new Teen Center at the Boys & Girls Club of the Foothills (BGCF).  The Center will target at-risk youth ages 12 to 19 in need of a safe environment, supportive relationships and opportunities to develop their talents and learn new skills.  Currently, BGCF serves 300 youth daily and over 1,000 each year and has a wait list of more than 100.  Program growth has been hampered by a lack of space.  In 2014, the use of a 10,000-square-foot city youth facility located in the same park as its main site in Monrovia was made available to BGCF, providing a cost-effective solution to expand.  Programming is focused on achieving outcomes in three areas: academic success, good character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles.  A strong emphasis is placed on high school graduation and higher education.  The new facility will be dedicated solely to teens, with a goal of enrolling 100 youth in the first program year, and increasing membership by 25% per year until the average daily attendance reaches 200 teens.  Vacated space in the main site will enable BGCF to serve the younger youth on its waiting list.  By 2017, BGCF anticipates serving a total of 500 youth daily and 2,000 annually.

California State University System

Long Beach, CA
$200,000
December 2014

This project aims to strengthen STEM learning and teaching by leveraging the expertise and fostering partnerships between universities and afterschool programs and informal science education institutions.  Three collaborative models will be implemented and studied to learn their respective benefits for providing future teachers with informal science experiences that develop their inquiry-based, hands-on science teaching expertise.  The evaluation will also examine challenges to sustaining cross-institutional partnerships and the factors that are effective in overcoming them.  The first model, Early Field Experience, will be in partnership with the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Beyond the Bell after-school program and aligned with a science course for STEM undergraduates, including students pursuing teaching careers.  The second, a Teaching Practicum Experience, will be conducted with the Long Beach Boys and Girls Club.  It will involve elementary and secondary teacher candidates and will be built into the pedagogical methods course that is a central part of teacher preparation.  The California Science Center and the Aquarium of the Pacific will offer the third, a paid informal science Internship for new teachers before they begin their classroom roles.  As many as 200 future teachers at different stages of their education, over 1,000 students in out-of-school programs, and children and families visiting informal education site will benefit from new STEM opportunities.  All three models are ones that the California State University wishes to use on an expanded basis on its 22 campuses that prepare the majority of California’s new teachers.

Community Coalition

Los Angeles, CA
$400,000
December 2014

Community Coalition has embarked on a capital campaign to purchase and renovate its headquarters to transform the space into a community center that captures the organization’s mission, impact, and vision for South Los Angeles.  The renovation will reflect the progress achieved in South LA over the past 24 years – achievements due in large part to Community Coalition’s work with over 4,500 African American and Latino residents and local government to improve the quality of life for South LA’s families.  After 20 years without any upgrades, the renovated building will include a large community room, high tech conference rooms, a volunteer center, and a new kitchen.  The newly configured facility will better accommodate the more than 400 people each week who are working together to strengthen education, health and human services.  The new space will exponentially increase the organization’s capacity to serve the community, and serve as an inspiring example of community-centered development in a neighborhood plagued by blight and neglect.

Family Health Care Centers of Greater Los Angeles

Bell Gardens, CA
$300,000
December 2014

Family Health Care Centers of Greater Los Angeles (FHCCGLA) has embarked on a three-phase capital project to expand and redesign its main facility, the Bell Gardens Family Medical Center.  The overall goal is to fully implement the patient-centered medical home service delivery model and enhance access to comprehensive and coordinated care.  In the first phase of the project, now completed, the administrative offices were moved to a newly acquired and renovated building next door and three new exam rooms were added to the clinical facility.  The second phase, which the W. M. Keck Foundation is supporting, will add nine exam rooms, enlarge the reception area and waiting room, optimize the nurse’s station, and create a new suite of provider offices.  Once complete, FHCCGLA will be better able to meet the increased demand for services as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and will increase the number of patients served from nearly 11,400 to 17,000 and visits from 41,800 to 57,600 by June 2016.  During the campaign’s third phase, the Center will retire the debt on the two buildings.

Foothill Family Service

Pasadena, CA
$250,000
December 2014

Foothill Family Service’s mission is to empower children and families in the San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys to overcome challenges and achieve success in relationships, school, and work.  In order to meet a growing demand for services in the eastern part of the San Gabriel Valley, as well as the Pomona Valley, and enhance its sustainability, Foothill Family has embarked on a capital campaign to purchase and renovate the building that it had been leasing to house its Duarte Family Center.  With the added space, existing mental health, counseling and early childhood development programs will be expanded and new programs will be introduced, including the provision of limited primary health care services in partnership with Community Health Alliance of Pasadena, a Federally Qualified Health Center.  The Duarte Family Center currently serves over 900 clients, including 500 children, and anticipates serving an additional 200 people during the first year in the re-opened building.

Inner City Education Foundation

Los Angeles, CA
$250,000
December 2014

Inner City Education Foundation (ICEF) is a charter management organization that operates 12 schools ranging from kindergarten through 12th grade that serve 4,200 students in South Los Angeles.  The View Park K-8 capital project is the first step in a multi-year process to place all ICEF schools into right-sized, permanent, quality educational sites.  Over the past 15 years, many disparate rented sites have been the home for View Park Elementary and Middle schools.  The goal is to finally unite all these students under one roof, solidifying ICEF’s permanence and organizational strength within the community.  The specific aims of the project are to: (1) Create a permanent home for 1,000 View Park students in grades K-8; (2) Have K-8 students meet or exceed State API targets by 2018; (3) Provide students in every classroom with access to technology based learning by 2015; and (4) Have the multipurpose room become a recognized and utilized center for activities by the View Park community.  The building will be completed in time for the start of the 2015-16 school year.  The W. M. Keck Foundation will help complete ICEF’s $1.5 million fundraising goal for costs related to the multipurpose room, an agency-wide data center, classroom furnishings and computers for students.

Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden

Arcadia, CA
$125,000
December 2014

Crescent Farm is a new installation that will promote water conservation and sustainable food production in home and community landscapes at a time of increasing environmental challenge.  Occupying 32,000 square feet of land at the very center of the Arboretum, Crescent Farm will demonstrate sustainable landscape practices.  Through hands-on activities focused on simple doable conservation strategies, a diverse and broad public will be involved in the testing of new ideas, methods and designs.  Measurements of water use and savings, identifying soils and insects associated with healthy garden ecosystems, observations of ground water recharge, and planting and harvesting are among the many engaging investigative experiences visitors and students will encounter.  During the two-year project, over 100,000 people will actively participate in Crescent Farm programs on site and via on-line outreach to schools, community gardens and neighborhood associations.  Progress toward educational goals will be evaluated through measures assessing both visitor and student learning.  A youth employment program, in collaboration with the Boys and Girls Club of the Foothills, will utilize the site to provide related job training for two to three teens annually.  The W. M. Keck Foundation’s grant will support a full-time interpretive horticulturist who, in collaboration with Arboretum education staff, will design new activities, classes and tours.

Northeast Valley Health Corporation

San Fernando, CA
$300,000
December 2014

The Northeast Valley Health Corporation (NEVHC) Pediatric Expansion of Dental Services (PEDS) Project will expand access to low-cost, quality and comprehensive oral health services for low-income and underserved, predominantly Latino youth six months to 18 years of age who reside in the northeast San Fernando Valley (SFV) of Los Angeles County.  In early 2015, NEVHC will open the new 5,300-square-foot San Fernando High School Teen Health Center (SFHS-THC) on the SFHS campus, which will contain four medical exam rooms (double the existing THC) and two dental operatories (a new service).  Additionally, by spring 2015, NEVHC will open a new six-operatory pediatric suite at the San Fernando Health Center (SFHC) Dental Clinic, doubling the number of operatories at this site to twelve.  W. M. Keck Foundation funds will be utilized to help purchase equipment for the eight new operatories as well as offset the start-up salaries of dental providers and assistants.  Nearly 1,100 additional pediatric patients will be served in 2015.

United Way of Greater Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CA
$350,000
December 2014

Home for Good is a collective effort across LA County to end veteran homelessness by 2015 and chronic homeless by 2016.  It is an initiative led by the United Way of Greater Los Angeles and the LA Area Chamber of Commerce and leveraged by the combined forces of one hundred cross-sector leaders and agencies.  A key component of the initiative is to create a countywide Coordinated Entry System (CES) of prioritization by which homeless individuals are quickly and effectively identified, assessed and matched to housing that best fits their needs.  This requires significant shifts in how homeless service providers work together and how resources are distributed to support their work.  A two-year W. M. Keck Foundation grant will provide the administrative support necessary to work with local community groups to expand CES to all homeless populations and geographic areas throughout Los Angeles County, remove regulatory barriers, and integrate other major systems in order to create a “no wrong door” to services approach.

Venice Family Clinic

Venice, CA
$300,000
December 2014

Venice Family Clinic (VFC) will expand access to pediatric care for low-income and underserved infants, children and teens in Mar Vista, an impoverished community on the Westside of Los Angeles, with its first-ever dedicated pediatric clinic.  The children’s health and wellness center’s primary goal is to address the critical unmet need for accessible, affordable pediatric care in this area.  The center will emphasize preventive care to help children and youth stay healthy while reducing their risk of chronic diseases.  At full capacity, the center aims to serve 4,500 pediatric patients through 13,500 medical visits and 2,000 dental visits each year.  In Phase I, VFC will renovate the children's health and wellness center.  Next, with the help of a W. M. Keck Foundation grant, VFC will complete a Phase II renovation to establish a permanent home for dental and vision services and other features.  The Children’s Center will open in spring 2015 and the second phase will be completed by summer 2016.

Volunteers of America

Los Angeles, CA
$150,000
December 2014

Blue Butterflies (BB) is a 76-unit townhouse complex in San Pedro acquired by Volunteers of America of Los Angeles (VOALA) as part of a Navy base reuse process.  The conveyance of the property to VOALA by the Navy requires that it be utilized to provide housing and supportive services to the homeless.  VOALA decided to target homeless women veterans and their children for permanent housing and services on the site.  The location is serene, which is ideal for these women, many of whom are suffering the effects of military sexual trauma, and their children.  The overall goal is to assist these families regain their dignity, hope and self-sufficiency.  At any one time, 74 women and up to 100 children will receive comprehensive services.  BB is also intended to be a model nationally for how to respond to the challenges faced by women veterans, especially for those at risk of homelessness among the more than 60,000 women veterans who will discharge from the military in the next five years.  A W. M. Keck Foundation grant will support renovation.

A Place Called Home

Los Angeles, CA
$200,000
June 2014

A Place Called Home (APCH) provides after-school and summer programming for 1,200 youth ages eight to 21 years in South Central Los Angeles.  The agency is renovating a warehouse across the street from its main facility to create a new teen center, gallery, and performing arts space.  The new space will replace one small bungalow where the teen program currently meets, provide additional space for arts activities and programming, and increase APCH’s capacity to serve the many youth on its waiting list.  The teen program, Bridge to the Future, helps young people successfully transition to adulthood as responsible and contributing citizens by providing tutoring, mentoring, scholarships, counseling, college preparation, internships, and leadership development.  Through the Creative Expressions Program, students participate in performing, visual and digital arts classes taught by professional dancers, musicians, actors and artists.  The Foundation’s grant will support the creation of dedicated visual and performing arts spaces that will include a convertible lobby, classroom and meeting spaces.

Bright Prospect

Pomona, CA
$200,000
June 2014

Bright Prospect is a college access and completion program.  Currently it serves 1,100 low income high school students in the greater Pomona area and 600 in college.  Participation is projected to grow to 3,000 students by 2018.  Participants receive guidance counseling and comprehensive supports through their high school and college years from staff and through peer support groups known as “Crews®.”  The Foundation’s three-year grant will support the incoming cohort of 248 high school juniors at five high schools in Pomona through their freshman year of college.  These students will graduate from high school in 2016 and at least 80% of them are expected to attend college.

Building Excellent Schools

Boston, MA
$250,000
June 2014

Building Excellent Schools (BES) trains and supports educational entrepreneurs to establish new Building Excellent Schools (BES) trains and supports educational entrepreneurs to establish new high-performing charter schools in low income communities.  There are eight BES schools in Los Angeles today.  BES will grow this network to 17 schools by 2017 that will enroll over 6,000 students by 2020.  Applicants are selected through a rigorous national application process for a two-year fellowship.  Fellows are trained in school design and leadership, governance, operations, assessment, and external relations.  Newly established BES Fellow‐founded schools have the support of a robust peer network of high‐performing BES schools and school leaders.  A two-year Foundation grant will support two new fellows and a new staff position to train and coach local fellows.

Foundation for California Community Colleges

Sacramento, CA
$350,000
June 2014

The California College Guidance Initiative (CCGI) is a statewide collaborative effort to increase college preparation among 6th‐12th grade students and help smooth their transition to college.  The partners are California’s three systems of public higher education (University of California, California State University and California Community Colleges) and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities.  CCGI will create web-based college guidance tools, including a complimentary mobile app, (www.CaliforniaColleges.edu) for students and their parents that integrate verified student data.  It will facilitate utilization of these tools by K-12 school districts, higher education campuses and college access providers.  Four school districts in Southern California are piloting the project.  Over the next three years, CCGI will expand the pilot to a minimum of four additional Southern California school districts and work with up to ten California State University and community college campuses to beta test the electronic delivery of verified student transcripts.  The Foundation’s three-year grant will support two new regional manager positions for the expanded pilot.

Santa Catalina Island Conservancy

Long Beach, CA
$200,000
June 2014

The Santa Catalina Island Conservancy will redesign, pilot and fully implement its NatureWorks program in partnership with the Avalon public schools and the Long Beach Unified School District.  NatureWorks is a school-based, sequential curriculum that combines classroom environmental and conservation science education with real-world experiences on Catalina Island.  The program, which currently focuses on the elementary and middle school grades, will be expanded through the 12th grade and include placements in ecotourism and conservation science internships and jobs.  Over 600 students will be served.  Creating pathways that link learning with career preparation will result in academic gains, workforce readiness and strengthen students’ long term opportunities.  The Foundation’s grant will support a full-time NatureWorks coordinator and students’ field experiences in the Island’s interior during the first two years of the project.  During year three, the Conservancy will document the methodology for use by other school districts and conservation organizations.

KCRW

Santa Monica, CA
$500,000
June 2014

KCRW has embarked on its first major capital campaign in its 75-year history to construct and equip a custom-designed Media Center and expand programming across multiple platforms – on-air, online, and in-person.  The 35,000-square-foot facility will be located on Santa Monica College’s Academy of Entertainment and Technology (AET) campus and provide KCRW with its first permanent home.  The new Media Center will triple KCRW’s studio production space, incorporate state-of-the-art broadcast and digital equipment and serve as a multipurpose venue.  By 2017, KCRW expects its radio listeners to increase from 500,000 to over 625,000, its web traffic to increase by 18% to over 688,000 monthly visitors, and its social media audience to increase by two-thirds to 2.5 million.  The Foundation’s grant will support equipment and program expansion.

Kidspace Children's Museum

Pasadena, CA
$250,000
June 2014

Kidspace Children’s Museum is renovating its 2.2 acre gardens to create a special place for young children that instills an appreciation of nature, promotes STEM education, and encourages discovery.  A grant from the Foundation will support the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a series of new interactive, child-driven outdoor exhibits.  The project is the next major milestone in the Museum’s multi-year Campaign for the Future of Kidspace, which was made public in 2012 with the opening of the Galvin Physics Forest and is aimed at creating new exhibits, improving current exhibits, enhancing the overall guest experience, and providing cutting-edge programming in informal education.  The Gardens project will expand the Museum’s capacity and attract an additional 25,000 children and families yearly beyond the 265,000 visitors served in 2013.

KIPP LA Schools

Los Angeles, CA
$175,000
June 2014

KIPP LA Schools is constructing a permanent facility for the KIPP Empower Academy (KEA) as part of its growth strategy to expand its network from nine to 20 charter schools by 2020.  In 2012-13, KEA was the highest performing school in the Los Angeles Unified School District and the tenth highest performing elementary school in California.  With the new building, KEA will be at full capacity in 2014-15 with over 550 students in grades K-4.  KEA employs a cutting-edge blended learning rotational model that allows teachers to provide small-group differentiated instruction in the four core areas of reading, writing, math, and science despite large class sizes of 28-30 students.  The Foundation’s grant will support construction.

Latino Theater Company

Los Angeles, CA
$150,000
June 2014

The Latino Theater Company (LTC) operates the Los Angeles Theatre Center, a multi-stage National Historic Landmark theater complex in downtown Los Angeles.  For over 28 years, LTC has explored the U.S. Latina/o experience in contemporary terms through ensemble-based work.  As the operators of the Center, LTC programs diverse seasons of arts programming that reflects the diversity of Los Angeles.  LTC also provides space and support to LATC tenants and many other local artistic programs.  In 2006, LTC undertook a major renovation of the complex, developing LATC into a distinctive arts center.  Now, LTC is undertaking additional improvements to upgrade the infrastructure, refurbish unusable space, and renovate the lobby and one of the four theaters.  The Foundation’s grant will support the first phase of this renovation.

Loyola Marymount University

Los Angeles, CA
$200,000
June 2014

American high schools and colleges are failing to provide the quality and quantity of graduates needed to meet the nation’s current and future STEM needs.  This situation is not surprising, given how little science is emphasized and how poorly it is taught at the elementary school level.  In response to this challenge, the Loyola Marymount University School of Education (SOE) is redesigning its preservice teacher preparation program to equip elementary school teachers to be effective STEM educators.  Led by SOE’s Center for Math and Science Teaching, a new yearlong sequence of theory and methods courses will be co-designed and co-taught with teachers from the Los Angeles Unified School District’s (LAUSD) Playa Vista Elementary School (PVES), a demonstration site that cultivates innovative teaching strategies to produce STEM literate students.  A Foundation grant will support the development and testing of K-5 curricular revisions with PVES teachers in year one, testing the new courses with 40 of LMU’s pre-service teacher candidates in year one and with an additional 20 pre-service teacher candidates each successive year, and a one-week institute in summer 2016 for 20 LAUSD teacher leaders pulled from three other demonstration school sites: Wright Middle School STEAM Magnet, Ambassador School of Global Education, and WISH Charter Elementary School.

New Horizons

North Hills, CA
$150,000
June 2014

New Horizons serves 1,000 adults with special needs annually.  Up until the 1950s, people born with mental retardation, cerebral palsy, autism and epilepsy were often institutionalized.  Times have changed, and people with intellectual disabilities are integrated into society through their schools and by living and working in the community.  As a result of this better quality of life, individuals with special needs are also living longer.  As they age, those with Down Syndrome in particular have a high occurrence of early-onset dementia that is the same as or similar to Alzheimer’s disease.  In response, New Horizons is building a six-bedroom memory care group home to serve this population.  The home will model best practices that enable residents to age in place and avoid nursing home placements.  New Horizons will also develop a staff training curriculum in partnership with the Southern California Alzheimer’s Association that will be disseminated along with lessons learned to medical and social service professionals, non-profits and families.  A Foundation grant will support construction of the memory care home.

Otis College of Art & Design

Los Angeles, CA
$100,000
June 2014

Otis College of Art and Design offers undergraduate and graduate degrees, continuing education and K-12 programs to a diverse student body.  To expand opportunities for arts education, Otis will develop and pilot a free Massive Open Online Course, Foundation in the Visual Arts.  This studio art course will offer self-paced, sequential instruction in drawing and composition, principles of design, life drawing and form and space.  Faculty members will demonstrate specific techniques, such as how to draw a head, through 26 digital learning objects that will also be available as stand-alone videos on Otis’ YouTube channel.  Participants will be able to correspond directly with a dedicated course facilitator via online office hours and through the course management software platform, and receive feedback on their art works from faculty and peers.  The project will leverage Otis’ existing school and community partnerships to reach students in grades 9-12.  The online course will be capped at 1,000 students, with the expectation that 500 will actively participate and 10% will complete it.  A Foundation grant will match Otis’ investment and cover the one-time only costs needed to launch the project.

Phoenix Houses of California, Inc.

Lake View Terrace, CA
$250,000
June 2014

Phoenix Houses of Los Angeles offers a range of residential and outpatient treatment services to at-risk teens and underserved adults across greater Los Angeles.  Through its Venice Center, over 400 men with co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders who have a history of criminal behavior and/or were recently released from incarceration were served last year.  In response to the Affordable Care Act, Phoenix House will develop and pilot a program to integrate primary care, mental health and substance abuse treatment to improve the health status of this high risk population.  A two-year Foundation grant will support staff to develop partnership(s) with healthcare providers and protocols for service and data integration.

Rainbow Services

San Pedro, CA
$140,000
June 2014

Rainbow Services annually serves nearly 500 low income victims of domestic violence and their children in the South Bay through its residential and community-based programs.  To meet the increased demand for its non-shelter services, the agency is undertaking a two-phase capital project.  Phase One of the project included the purchase and renovation of an existing office building to house the administrative staff and expand legal services, community education and training programs.  It has been completed.  The Foundation’s capital grant will support Phase Two to renovate Rainbow Services’ existing Community Resource Center for expanded and enhanced counseling and children’s programs.

Valley Community Clinic

North Hollywood, CA
$250,000
June 2014

Valley Community Clinic (VCC) was chosen through a competitive process by the Los Angeles Unified School District to operate one of the 14 school-based, full-service community health centers it is establishing in medically underserved neighborhoods.  The 14,000-square-foot health center will be located on the campus of James Monroe High School in North Hills.  Primary care, dental and vision care, and behavioral health and counseling services will be provided to students, their families and the general community.  VCC will also replicate its peer-run teen clinic and provide curriculum development and internship opportunities as part of the high school’s Medical Career Pathways program.  By 2017, VCC expects to serve 15,000 patients annually.  A two-year Foundation grant will provide start-up funding for equipment and staff.

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